Just Sociology

Essential Sociology Reading for Undergrads & Differences in Degree Programs

Sociology is the study of human society, social relationships, and institutions. It is a popular field of study for undergraduate students, given its relevance to contemporary issues such as inequality, globalization, and social justice.

As a result, students of sociology are required to undertake some introductory reading before beginning their undergraduate degree program. In this article, we will explore some of the recommended textbooks, written by renowned authors such as Giddens, Fulcher, Scott, Cohen, Kennedy, Haralambos, and Holborn.

Additionally, we will discuss sociology books written by sociologists such as Globalisation, Giddens, and Bauman. We will also highlight some of the recommended podcasts, videos, and blogs, such as “Thinking Allowed,” TED talks, London School of Economics blog, and contemporary sociology.

Lastly, we will examine the recommended reading list by university, including Sociological Imagination, Social Inequalities and Divisions, Sociology in Global Context,to the Sociology of Culture, and Research Methods.

Recommended Textbooks

One of the fundamental aspects of introductory reading for undergraduate degree in sociology is a comprehensive list of recommended textbooks. A few of the most popular textbooks include Sociology by Anthony Giddens, Sociology by John Fulcher, Sociology by Alex Scott and The Sociology of Organizations by Michael J.

Carter. Moreover, several others, including Sociology by Anthony Giddens, Sociology: Themes and Perspectives by Haralambos, and Sociological Perspectives on Social Policy by Mark Langan, are considered foundational.

During their undergraduate degree, students are required to read these books to familiarize themselves with the basic concepts and principles of sociology.

Sociology Books Written by Sociologists

In addition to academic textbooks, students of sociology can benefit from reading sociological literature. Globalisation by Zygmunt Bauman and Sociology by Anthony Giddens are two excellent examples of such literature.

These books provide deep insights into complex sociological theories and present them in a reader-friendly manner. They appeal to students of sociology by presenting the challenges of globalization in contemporary society and introducing conceptual frameworks for analyzing the world.

Podcasts, Videos, and Blogs

Aside from textbooks and literature, there are other resources available to students of sociology, including podcasts, videos, and blogs. BBC Radio 4’s “Thinking Allowed” podcast is one such resource that examines contemporary issues in society, social science research, and theoretical concepts.

TED Talks is another great resource for sociology students, offering perspectives on topics such as social inequality, gender politics, and cultural sociology. The London School of Economics blog provides timely updates on contemporary sociology issues while Contemporary Sociology covers articles about comprehensive theoretical frameworks.

Recommended Reading List by University

Universities that offer sociology degrees have their own recommended reading lists, which contain a range of academic books and articles on sociology topics. Some of these recommended books include The Sociological Imagination by C.

Wright Mills, Social Inequalities and Divisions by Alison Brammer, Sociology in Global Context by Robin Cohen,to the Sociology of Culture by David Inglis, and Research Methods by Alan Bryman. Each of these books serves a different purpose, and together they provide students with broad coverage of the field.

Differences Between A-Level and Degree Level Sociology

Content Differences

There are significant differences between A-Level and degree-level sociology courses in terms of content, specialisms, and focus. The content of sociology courses at A-Level is generally more basic and introductory, covering a range of topics and theories, while degree-level courses are more specialized and advanced in terms of content.

In degree programs, specialization becomes necessary to gain a deeper understanding of the sub-fields, such as politics, social policy, media, and culture.

Skills Differences

The level of depth, critical awareness, and analysis and evaluation from students differ between A-Level and degree-level courses. Students of sociology at the degree level engage with complex ideas and gather and synthesize evidence independently.

They are expected to practice self-starting and require a higher level of reading, writing, and critical analysis skills than their A-Level counterparts. Additionally, students of degree-level courses are expected to spend significantly more time in contact with their lecturers.

Common Themes in Sociology Degree Courses

Despite the differences in content, there are common themes in sociology degree courses that students can expect to encounter. For example, sociology students are required to take courses in research methods and social theory.

They are also exposed to topics such as globalization, identity, gender, and ethnicity. Lastly, sociology degree students often have the option to undertake a dissertation based on their interests, giving them the opportunity to utilize learned research methods and theories to produce original research.

Conclusion

In summary, introductory reading is an essential requirement for students who wish to pursue an undergraduate degree in sociology. This article has explored a range of recommended books, literature, podcasts, videos, and blogs, as well as university-specific reading lists.

We have also noted some of the differences between A-Level and degree-level sociology courses, including variations in content, specialization, focus, depth of critical awareness, analysis and evaluation, evidence, self-starting, reading, writing, and contact time. Students who undertake the recommended reading and gain the necessary skills can expect to develop a deep understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of sociology.

In conclusion, this article has highlighted the importance of introductory reading for undergraduate students of sociology, including recommended textbooks, literature, podcasts, videos, blogs, and university-specific reading lists. We have also discussed the differences between A-Level and degree-level sociology courses, touching upon content, skills, and common themes.

Having a solid foundation in the principles of sociology is essential for those looking to understand the complexities of contemporary society and contribute to positive social change.

FAQs:

1.

What are some recommended textbooks for sociology students?

– Sociology by Giddens, Fulcher, and Scott, The Sociology of Organizations by Carter, and Sociological Perspectives on Social Policy by Langan are some recommended textbooks.

2. What types of resources are available in addition to textbooks and literature for students of sociology?

– Students can benefit from podcasts, videos, and blogs such as “Thinking Allowed,” TED Talks, the London School of Economics blog, and Contemporary Sociology. 3.

What are some of the differences between A-Level and degree-level sociology courses? – Degree-level courses are more specialized and advanced in terms of content, require a higher level of reading, writing, and critical analysis skills, and have more contact time with lecturers.

4. What are some of the common themes in sociology degree courses?

– Students are expected to study research methods, social theory, and topics such as globalization, identity, gender, and ethnicity. 5.

Why is it important to have a solid foundation in the principles of sociology? – Having a solid foundation is necessary to understand the complexities of contemporary society and contribute to positive social change.

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