Just Sociology

Exploring Corporate Criminality Structuralist Marxism and Income Inequalities

Corporate criminality and the relevance of Structuralist Marxism may seem like disparate topics, but they are interconnected in the realm of social justice. Corporations that engage in criminal behavior exploit their workers and contribute to income inequality, while the decline of social housing creates widespread homelessness and perpetuates cyclical poverty.

In this article, we will explore the complexities of these topics and how they relate to larger systemic issues.

Corporate Criminality

Corporate criminality is a systemic issue that affects countless workers across the globe. One of the prevalent forms of corporate criminality is wage theft, which occurs when employers withhold wages or benefits from their employees.

Perhaps the most infamous wage theft case in recent years is Chipotle, which was sued for $150 million for allegedly violating labor laws across 2,000 of its restaurants. Similarly, McDonald’s and Papa John’s have also been accused of wage theft and worker intimidation, highlighting the urgency of the problem.

Another form of corporate criminality that has gained media attention is discrimination. Federal regulators are continually investigating companies for discrimination against marginalized communities, including people of color and those within the LGBTQ+ community.

Though some states have implemented anti-discrimination laws, the industry as a whole remains resistant to change. These companies may argue that such acts represent isolated incidents and not an overall trend, but studies have shown that systemic discriminatory practices are pervasive.

Wage Theft

Wage theft is a form of corporate criminality that affects employees the most. According to the Economic Policy Institute, between 2013 and 2015, employers in the United States stole $15 billion in wages from employees.

This is a staggering amount that highlights the urgent need for government action to combat this issue. Chipotle is the most high-profile case in recent years of wage theft.

The restaurant chain was accused of violating labor laws by forcing employees to work off the clock or overtime without proper pay. The case against Chipotle was eventually settled for $150 million, but the problem persists across industries.

McDonald’s and Papa John’s have been accused of wage theft as well. In 2016, the National Labor Relations Board found that McDonald’s was a joint employer responsible for more than 150 complaints of wage theft and retaliation against workers.

The board also found that Papa John’s was guilty of retaliation against employees who tried to organize for better wages.

Discrimination

Discrimination is another form of corporate criminality that perpetuates income inequality and systemic poverty. Federal regulators have been investigating companies for discrimination against marginalized communities for years.

Despite some states implementing anti-discrimination laws, the industry as a whole remains resistant to change. Studies have shown that systemic discriminatory practices are widespread in the industry.

For example, it was found that women in finance and accounting earn less than their male counterparts, while Black and Hispanic workers earn less than white workers in the construction industry. Discriminatory practices within corporations are fueling income inequality, and employers must be held accountable for adhering to fair hiring and compensation practices.

Relevance of Structuralist Marxism

Structuralist Marxism analyzes social and economic structures to better understand the exploitation of marginalized communities. As we explore the decline of social housing, we can understand the relevance of Structuralist Marxism in terms of social and economic structures that perpetuate systemic poverty.

Decline of Social Housing

The decline of social housing is a significant issue in the current landscape of housing in the UK. A substantial number of residents living in the private rental sector is spending more than 30% of their income on housing, while many others face eviction due to non-payment of rent.

The private rental sector costs the government 10 billion a year in housing benefits, highlighting the need for change. The decline in social housing has led to an extreme lack of affordable housing, creating widespread homelessness and poverty.

Local councils have found it increasingly challenging to provide housing solutions for their communities, leading to the need for innovative and sustainable alternatives.

Benefits of Social Housing

Social housing has been a vital element in providing stability and security for marginalized communities. With security of tenure, tenants have the guarantee of being able to reside in their homes for the long-term, which can help to increase their social and economic mobility.

Social housing also provides a sense of community, creating spaces where people can come together to create positive change within their communities. Over the years, social housing has been ideologically driven, ensuring that traditional Marxist theories that highlighted the importance of equitable distribution of resources were implemented.

Conclusion

In conclusion, corporate criminality and the decline of social housing are complex topics that highlight issues of income inequality and systemic poverty. As we grapple with these issues, it is important to interrogate the social and economic structures that perpetuate these injustices.

By holding corporations accountable for their actions and restructuring the housing industry, we can create a more equitable and just society. 3: Income Inequalities

Income inequality is a pervasive problem globally, contributing to systemic poverty and limiting social and economic mobility for marginalized communities.

This topic is vast and multifaceted, but by exploring the subtopics of top earners versus bottom earners and median income for different households, we can better understand the complexities of the issue and the need for systemic change. Top Earners vs.

Bottom Earners

The top 10% of earners in the United States earn roughly 50% of the country’s total income, while the bottom 40% earn just 9%. This disparity creates substantial wealth and income gap in the United States and is a significant contributor to systemic poverty.

The average combined salaries of the top executives of the world’s largest corporations are around $20 million per year, highlighting the stark contrast between the pay of the highest earners and that of the average worker. Not only does this contribute to income inequality, but it also reinforces the idea of a “class divide,” which affects the social and economic mobility of those in lower income brackets.

The exacerbation of income inequality also perpetuates other forms of social inequality, including health and education disparities. Health disparity, for example, contributes to the burden of diseases borne by those living in poverty compared to those in higher income brackets.

Furthermore, wealth and income inequality curbs access to quality education and, subsequently, creates disparities among students from low-income households in educational attainment, including access to necessary resources such as textbooks and qualified instructors.

Median Income for Different Households

The median income for households in the United States is approximately $63,179, but income differs significantly by demographic. The income distribution for different household types is variegated, as highlighted below:

– Fifth Decile (50% of households that fall within this range have an income between $40,000 and $50,000): Typically, minimum wage workers and lower-income workers fall into this category.

This median income is not sufficient to provide for the necessities needed for everyday life in the United States, including decent housing, food, and healthcare. – Single Adult: According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey, single adults have a median income of $31,075, which is well below the poverty line.

As a result, single people have difficulty meeting their basic needs, including food, housing, and healthcare. For low-income single people, the absence of social support further compounds stress levels and impedes future economic stability.

– Couple: The median income for a couple with no children is roughly $78,000 per year, with families with children requiring additional funds. With couples requiring almost double the income of single adults, this highlights the need for additional support for families with low incomes.

– Two Children: The median income for two adults with two children is $118,200 per year, which is still not enough to ensure financial sustainability. The high cost of housing, healthcare, and childcare for families with children compels both parents to work full-time, which creates an unnecessary burden on working-class and low-income people.

Conclusion

Income inequality is a significant issue in the United States, with the top earners earning substantially more than the bottom earners. While median income for households vary, it is clear that low-income households are experiencing difficulty meeting basic needs.

Furthermore, income inequality perpetuates other forms of social inequality that impact quality of life, creating major obstacles for those who want to improve their economic circumstances. In light of these challenges, we should advocate for systemic change that combats income inequality, providing the marginalized and those trapped in cyclical poverty with an opportunity to lead dignified lives.

Conclusion

Corporate criminality, the relevance of Structuralist Marxism, and income inequalities are three significant issues that contribute to systemic poverty in society. Wage theft, discrimination, and the decline of social housing perpetuate income inequality, while disparities in income between top earners and bottom earners create a wealth and income gap in the United States.

Meanwhile, median income distribution among different household types further emphasizes economic disparities. It is essential to address these issues with systemic change in order to create a more equitable and just society.

FAQs

Q: How does corporate criminality perpetuate income inequality? A: Corporate criminality, such as wage theft and discrimination, exploits marginalized communities and contributes to income inequality.

Q: How does the decline of social housing contribute to systemic poverty? A: Decline in social housing leads to a lack of affordable housing, resulting in widespread homelessness, perpetuating cyclical poverty.

Q: What is the relevance of Structuralist Marxism? A: Structuralist Marxism analyzes social and economic structures to understand the exploitation of marginalized communities, like cyclical poverty and homelessness.

Q: How does income inequality perpetuate other forms of social inequality? A: Income inequality perpetuates disparities in health and education, making it difficult for low-income families to access resources such as textbooks and qualified instructors.

Q: Who is affected by income inequality? A: Income inequality affects marginalized communities, particularly low-income families and people of color.

Q: What is the median income for different household types? A: The median income for different household types includes the fifth decile ($40,000 to $50,000), single adults ($31,075), couples ($78,000), and two children ($118,200).

Q: Why is it challenging for low-income families to meet basic needs? A: The high cost of housing, healthcare, and childcare for families with children compels both parents to work full-time, creating an unnecessary burden on those who are working-class and low-income.

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