Just Sociology

The NEET Crisis: Origins Consequences and Solutions

Over the past few decades, the term “underclass” has been used extensively in America and Britain to describe a section of the population that is cut off from the mainstream due to long-term unemployment and reliance on welfare. The established norms and values that govern social behavior are often absent among these groups, leading to a culture of worklessness and an inability to behave appropriately.

In recent years, the term “underclass” has taken on a new meaning with the arrival of NEETS (young people not in employment, education or training) in Britain. NEETS are considered a social and economic drag on society, and their disproportionate numbers have raised concerns about the cost to taxpayers and society.

In this article, we will explore the origins and potential consequences of the underclass in America and Britain, with a specific focus on the impact of NEETS. Origin of the term ‘the underclass’

The term “underclass” was first used by American sociologist Charles Murray in the mid-1980s to refer to a group of long-term unemployed and welfare-dependent individuals who were cut off from ordinary social life.

Murray argued that the underclass was not constrained by social norms and values, leading to a culture of worklessness and dependency on welfare. This group was considered to be different from the working class, who were still connected to the mainstream economy despite their low wages and precarious employment.

Murray’s views were heavily criticized for their harsh portrayal of the underclass as a morally deficient group responsible for their own plight.

Creation of a potential problem in society

The concept of the underclass created a potential problem in society by suggesting that there was a group of people who were not only poor but also disconnected from society. This disconnection was seen as a cause of social problems such as crime, drug addiction, and poor health.

However, the notion that the underclass was a homogeneous group with a distinct culture of worklessness and dependency was questioned by many scholars. Moreover, the idea that the underclass was cut off from ordinary social life also drew criticism, as it suggested that there was a clear boundary between the underclass and the rest of society.

Arrival of the underclass in Britain in the form of NEETS

In recent years, the concept of the underclass has taken on a new meaning in Britain with the arrival of NEETS. NEETS are young people who are not in employment, education, or training.

They are considered to be a social and economic drag on society and their disproportionate numbers have raised concerns about the cost to taxpayers and society. Official studies and ministerial papers have highlighted the social and economic cost of NEETS, who are more likely to engage in antisocial behavior, crime, and drug addiction.

They are also more likely to have poor health and to become teenage mothers.

Cost of NEETS on taxpayers and society

The cost of NEETS on taxpayers and society is significant. The cost of crime alone is estimated to be 1.2 billion per year, while the cost of public health services is estimated to be 2.4 billion per year.

NEETS are more likely to engage in antisocial behavior, which can lead to higher policing costs, court costs, and the cost of imprisonment. Moreover, NEETS are disproportionately represented among drug addicts, who require expensive treatment.

The cost of teenage mothers, who are more likely to be NEETS, is also significant, as it involves the cost of housing, childcare, and welfare payments. In addition, the low participation of NEETS in the labor force reduces the productivity of the country, leading to a long-term economic cost.

High crime rates

One of the most significant impacts of NEETS is the high crime rates associated with this group. NEETS are more likely to be engaged in petty crime and antisocial behavior, such as vandalism, loitering, or verbal abuse.

They are also more likely to be involved in serious crimes, such as burglary, robbery or drug dealing. The cost of dealing with these crimes is significant, involving court costs, policing costs, and imprisonment costs, which are borne by taxpayers.

Furthermore, the fear of crime can reduce the quality of life in certain areas, leading to disinvestment and a decline in social cohesion.

Low participation in the labor force

Another impact of NEETS is their low participation in the labor force. The lack of skills, experience, and qualifications makes it difficult for NEETS to access the job market, which in turn reduces their chances of economic independence and social integration.

The cycle of poverty and deprivation is perpetuated by the lack of opportunities and the limited social mobility. The cost to society of this lack of productivity is significant, as it reduces the gross national product and leads to a long-term economic cost.

Inability to Behave Appropriately

Another impact of NEETS is their inability to behave appropriately, especially in social situations that require conformity to established norms and values. This lack of socialization can manifest in various ways, such as the inability to sit still in classrooms, the tendency to disrupt the class, or the tendency to hit people.

The consequences of this behavior are numerous, from the loss of educational opportunities to the inability to secure and maintain relationships. Conclusion:

In conclusion, the concept of the underclass in America and Britain has been the subject of intense debate and scrutiny for several decades.

The arrival of NEETS in Britain has brought this issue to the forefront of public attention, highlighting the social and economic cost of disconnection and dependency. The impact of NEETS on crime rates, labor force participation, and socialization underscores the need for effective policies that address the root causes of social exclusion and deprivation.

Ultimately, the goal should be to create a society that is inclusive, equitable, and sustainable, where everyone has access to opportunities and the means to achieve their full potential.The problem of the underclass in America and Britain, as addressed in the previous section, has given rise to the new phenomenon of NEETS. This group of young people is not only disconnected from society but also lacks the skills and experience to become economically independent.

The high cost of dealing with NEETS has led to intense debate about the best way to address their needs and provide them with the opportunities they need to succeed. Charles Murray, a prominent American sociologist, has been one of the leading voices on this issue.

In this article, we will explore Murray’s comments on NEETS and how they relate to the current situation in Britain. Murray’s warning

Murray’s comments on NEETS were largely centered around the societal impact of the first big generation of single mothers in America.

In his book, “Coming Apart,” Murray warned that children from single-parent households were more likely to have problems in school, be involved in crime, and need welfare. Murray’s analysis found that people who did not grow up in stable families were more likely to be disconnected from mainstream society and struggle to find a place in the economy.

Murray also predicted that the children of single mothers would have difficulties adapting to the norms and values of society and that this would lead to a cycle of social exclusion and poverty.

Problems similar to those predicted by Murray

It seems that the problems predicted by Murray are indeed present in Britain today. NEETS in Britain are more likely to be from single-parent households, and they are also more likely to lack basic cognitive and behavioral skills.

In fact, research has shown that the majority of NEETS have low levels of literacy and numeracy, making it difficult for them to access the job market. The cycle of poverty is perpetuated by the lack of opportunities and the limited social mobility.

NEETS come from a wide range of backgrounds and are not limited to any specific region or social class. However, evidence suggests that the problems they face are remarkably similar to those predicted by Murray.

Difficulties in providing basic conditioning

One of the key challenges in addressing the problem of NEETS is the difficulty in providing them with basic conditioning. Murray argued that children from single-parent households were less likely to receive the necessary conditioning for success in life.

Early childhood is a critical period for brain development, and the success of children in later life depends on the development of basic social and cognitive skills. These skills are not only crucial for academic success but also for success in the job market and social integration.

NEETS often lack the basic conditioning needed to succeed in life. Many of them come from unstable households where the lack of parental involvement and guidance has left them ill-prepared for the challenges of adult life.

Moreover, the lack of conditioning has left them unable to behave appropriately in social situations. This lack of socialization can manifest in various ways, such as the inability to sit still in classrooms, the tendency to disrupt the class, or the tendency to hit people.

Such problems can, in turn, result in difficulties in accessing educational opportunities and job opportunities. Conclusion:

In conclusion, NEETS are a significant social and economic problem in Britain today.

The arrival of NEETS in Britain has brought the issue of the underclass to the forefront of public attention, highlighting the social and economic cost of disconnection and dependency. Charles Murray’s comments on NEETS, although a subject of controversy, seem to resonate with the current situation in Britain.

The impact of NEETS on crime rates, labor force participation, and socialization underscores the need for effective policies that address the root causes of social exclusion and deprivation. Ultimately, the goal should be to create a society that is inclusive, equitable, and sustainable, where everyone has access to opportunities and the means to achieve their full potential.

It is critical that we invest in the early learning experiences of children, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds, to ensure that they have the necessary conditioning to succeed in life. A collective effort is needed from policymakers, educators, parents, and the wider community to ensure that NEETS are given the necessary support and opportunities to thrive.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, the article has highlighted the significant problem of the underclass in America and Britain, with a specific focus on the impact of NEETS. We have explored various subtopics, including the origin of the term “underclass,” the arrival of NEETS in Britain, the cost of NEETS on taxpayers and society, and Charles Murray’s comments on NEETS.

The key challenges associated with NEETS include the difficulties in providing basic conditioning, low participation in the labor force, and high crime rates. Effective policies and collective effort from policymakers, educators, parents, and the wider community are crucial in addressing these challenges and ensuring that NEETS are given the necessary support and opportunities to succeed.

FAQs:

Q: What is the underclass? A: The underclass is a group of long-term unemployed and welfare-dependent individuals who are cut off from ordinary social life and are not constrained by social norms and values.

Q: What is a NEET? A: NEETS are young people who are not in employment, education, or training.

Q: What is the cost of NEETS to taxpayers and society? A: NEETS cost taxpayers and society in several ways, including through the cost of crime, public health, antisocial behavior, and the cost of teenage mothers.

Q: What are the challenges associated with providing basic conditioning for NEETS? A: The challenges include addressing the lack of socialization, cognitive and behavioral skills, and access to education and job opportunities.

Q: What is the impact of NEETS on society? A: The impact of NEETS on society includes high crime rates, low participation in the labor force, and difficulties in providing basic conditioning.

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